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  • April 05

     
  • April 06

  • April 07

  • April 08

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - I

    S3

    Challenges of Water Supply and Sanitation for Urban and Rural Areas

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - II

    BS3

    Financing of Irrigation Projects

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - III

    CS2

    Efficient Water Use in Agriculture

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - IV

    CS1

    Rainwater Harvesting and Water Conservation at Local Level

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 8 - V

    SE3

    Water Film Fest

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - I

    S4

    Water and Health – Managing Water Quality

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - II

    S5

    Environment, Climate Change and Water

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - III

    CS3

    Model for Efficient Water Management at Local Level in Urban and Peri-urban Areas

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - IV

    PD5

    Strategy to Achieve Targets under UN Sustainable Development Goals in Water Sector

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 8 - V

    SE3

    Water Film Fest

S3 Challenges of Water Supply and Sanitation for Urban and Rural Areas

10:00-13:00 Hrs
Hall 7-I

Clean, accessible water for all is an essential part of the world we want to live in. There is sufficient fresh water on the planet to achieve this. But, due to bad economics or poor infrastructure, every year millions of people, most of them children, die from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene. Water scarcity, poor water quality and inadequate sanitation negatively impact food security, livelihood choices and educational opportunities for poor families across the world. As per UN report, by 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water.

Water supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) is fundamentally important to lives and livelihoods, and underpins poverty alleviation and sustainable development. At a basic level, everyone needs access to safe water in adequate quantities for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene, and sanitation facilities that do not compromise health or dignity. Lack of WASH takes a huge toll on health and well-being and comes at a large financial cost, including a sizeable loss of economic activity in many countries, not just least developed countries. While the impacts are most pronounced in lower income countries, challenges remain in wealthier nations where concerns regarding water safety and environmental sustainability persist alongside inequalities. Many of the broader implications of inadequate WASH – for education, cognitive development and nutrition – are not fully documented, and inadequate WASH is one of many deprivations suffered by the poorest and most marginalized populations. As per UN report, Investments in water and sanitation services result in substantial economic gains; in developing regions the return on investment has been estimated at US$5 to US$28 per dollar.

India achieved the MDG target of the year 2012 for drinking water. Approximately 93 percent of total population is having access to improved use of drinking water sources. But still quality of drinking water is a matter of concern. A recent report by the United Nations says that in India, over one lakh people die of water-borne diseases annually. It is reported that groundwater in one-third of India’s 600 districts is not fit for drinking as the concentration of fluoride, iron, salinity and arsenic exceeds the tolerance levels. About 65 million people have been suffering from fluorosis, a crippling disease due to high amount of fluoride and five million are suffering from arsenicosis in West Bengal due to high amount of arsenic. A World Resources Report says: about 70 percent of India’s water supply is seriously polluted with sewage effluents. The UN reported that India’s water quality is poor - it ranks 120th among the 122 nations in terms of quality of water available to its citizens.

Approximately less than 50% population of the country was having access to an improved sanitation facility in year 2012 as per WHO, UNICEF 2014. The Country’s urban population which is constantly increasing from 78.9 million in 1961, 286 million in year 2001, 377 million in year 2011, and expected to reach about 36% of total population by year 2025. Between 2014 and 2050, the urban areas are expected to grow by 404 million people in India as per UN Report, 2014. The increase in the number of people without access to water and sanitation in urban areas is directly related to the rapid growth of slum populations which is approximately 17% of total urban population which lives in slums as per 2011 census. The slum population is also more vulnerable to the impacts of extreme weather events. It is however possible to improve performance of urban water supply systems while continuing to expand the system and addressing the needs of the poor.

BS3 Financing of Irrigation Projects

10:00-13:00 Hrs
Hall 7-II

Financing of irrigation projects is really a broad issue, of which each main component requires a specific analysis in respect of investment, operation, maintenance, renewal, rehabilitation and modernization including updation of technology such as automation of distribution network. It impacts on the project cost. For example, less costly infrastructures often generate more current operation and maintenance expenses and technology costs more in investment, but allow significant savings of water.

The other issues such as preservation of ecosystems and natural resources will further affect the project financing and should be dealt accordingly for sustainable development of water resources projects. The role of private sectors, public private partnership either for financing, building and/or operating, and contributions and involvements of the water end users, end payers and water user associations and communities are to be considered for various financing mechanisms to succeed and as a future perspective in the matter.

Financing of water resources projects require front loading where considerable capital investments are required to be made before the gains start rolling in. This issue makes deployment of private capital difficult. The present model of evaluating and accounting for the benefits especially from irrigation projects requires an overhaul in the context of changing economies and capital availability at Government level. A better appreciation and quantification of tangible and intangible benefits is required to attract the capital investment made to the water resources projects.

In India, the irrigation projects are planned, executed and maintained by the State Governments as per their own need, priority and fund availability. While the Central Government of India provides technical and financial assistance to State Governments to encourage sustainable development and efficient management of water resources and irrigation infrastructure through various schemes and programmes. Sustainability of financing arrangements through a very long and most of the times indefinite operational period requires a systematic change in revenue models for operation stage projects. Capital requirement for other issues like dam safety assurance and modernization/upgradation require financial resources through different models. On the whole, financial viability of an everlasting project historic period of time often spanning into decades and centuries require different approaches, which are needed urgently.

The brainstorming session aims to highlight the main lessons learnt from the past, to analyze the present constraints and trends, and to propose in which directions to steer forward.

CS2 Efficient Water Use in Agriculture

10:00-13:00 Hrs
Hall 7-III

Sustainable development of land and water resources is very important for a country like India which shares about 16% of the global population with only 2.4% of land and 4% of water resources. India is an agricultural country and around 60-70% of population is dependent on agriculture.

The growing demand of food grains needs more efforts to enhance agricultural production. This necessitates efficient utilization of all inputs to agriculture; especially water, as it consumes more than 70% of total water.

Efficient and judicious use of water in agriculture can be achieved by introducing the advanced methods of irrigation like Micro-Irrigation which will help in savings of significant amounts of water and increase the quality and quantity of produce. Micro-irrigation is the application of water in and around the root zone of the plants, achieving higher water use efficiency resulting in improved crop yield. With Micro-Irrigation, substantial quantum of water can be saved over conventional methods and 90 to 95 % on farm water use efficiency can be achieved. Significant savings in the use of fertilizers (20 to 50%) and 20 to 70 % increase in yield can be achieved.

Apart from this, management of cropping patterns for the areas in line with local availability is a need of the hour. Economic models established for the community may have to undergo transformation in such cases timely leading to sustenance to change. There are other angles to improving water use efficiency at storage and conveyance levels as well, which have a bearing in overall efficiency targets.

Govt. of India had launched a Centrally Sponsored Scheme named National Mission for Micro-Irrigation (NMMI) during the year 2005-06 under XI Plan to promote Micro-Irrigation.National Water Mission has been constituted during the year 2008 with its goal to increase the water use efficiency by 20%. These emphasize the need for water conservation and improvement in water-use efficiency to achieve “More Crop per Drop” at the field level.

Some of the measures required to improve irrigation efficiency are Lining of canals, Proper operation and maintenance of irrigation system, Recovery of water charges to meet the operation and maintenance cost, Equitable water distribution, Automation, effective Management Information System (MIS) and decision support system (DSS), Participatory Irrigation Management, Improvement on farm level water management, Reducing gap in Irrigation potential created and utilized, Promotion of Micro-Irrigation techniques like Drip and Sprinkler irrigation, Fertigation Chemigation etc and session will take up the issues for transforming them into ensuring efficiency and sustainability building in the sector.

CS1 Rainwater Harvesting and Water Conservation at Local Level

10:00-13:00 Hrs
Hall 7-IV

Groundwater plays an important role in water resources sector for meeting the water requirements especially for agriculture, domestic and industrial purposes. It is a significant source of irrigation and accounts for more than half of the net irrigated area in the country. Easy availability of groundwater has supported farmers to increase its use in agricultural field. But, over-exploitation of the resource through extraction by huge number of abstraction wells and structures built in clusters has led to cascade of adverse impacts such as, steep decline in groundwater levels, failure of shallow tube wells, low yield and deterioration in quantity and quality of groundwater availability.

In India, water conservation in the form of rainwater harvesting is an ancient tradition which has become more relevant in the present scenario for addressing ever increasing demands and climate change issues. While looking at the 4500 BC old and simplest forms of earthwork structures, scientifically evolved and developed water harvesting/ artificial recharge structures of the 21st century remained us on the importance of conserving water for its optimal use and making it available during the lean period.

Rain water harvesting reduces the dependency on available water resources while artificial recharge helps in raising the groundwater table. As the rainfall occurrence in India is limited to about three months period ranging from around 10 to 100 days spells, the natural recharge to groundwater reservoir is restricted to this period only. The artificial recharge and rain water harvesting techniques helps to increase the recharge amount and period in the monsoon and post-monsoon seasons for about 3 or more months. This results in maintaining sustainability to the availability of groundwater during the water scarcity period as well. The rain water harvesting techniques at local level help in bringing the over exploited blocks into critical, semi-critical and even under safe category conditions.

The issue of water conservation is not just about “saving water” but it is about having enough quantity of water at any given time and place to meet the requirements. Several efforts have been made in India and other parts of world in storing rain water on surface/sub-surface to recharge the groundwater source. The Ministry of Water Resources, River Development & Ganga Rejuvenation, Government of India has also taken various initiatives for promoting artificial recharge and rain water harvesting with the application of Groundwater Aquifer Mapping techniques. Many numbers of baseline studies and demonstrative projects have also been taken up in India in this regards.

The session will devote to address the merits and demerits of the rain water harvesting and water conservation methods applied at local level and way forward for ensuring their sustainability in adaptations and applications.

SE3 Water Film Fest

10:00-13:00 and 14:00-17:00 Hrs
Hall 8-V

India Water Week is one of the mega annual event of the Ministry of Water Resources, River Development & Ganga Rejuvenation. The Government of India started the event from 2012 onwards. The objective of the event is to provide a multi stakeholders forum to discuss key strategies for conservation, preservation and optimum use of available water and natural resources. This year the mega event will be organized from April 4 to April 8, 2016 on the theme “Water for All : Striving together”.

A major objective of the India Water Week is also to broaden the participation from all Stakeholders including the Youth at large and create awareness on various aspects related to water conservation. To fulfill this objective films and documentaries could play an extremely valuable role. In the recent past there have been several success stories related to water conservation in different parts of the country and sharing those motivating stories will help in replicating them further. Moreover, films could be an extremely important, viable and exciting medium to engage with youth and community directly.

IWP in association with CMSR Foundation ( a network partner of IWP) proposes to organize a day long screening of films and documentaries highlighting successful stories of water conservation, technological innovations and people’s participation during India Water Week-2016. Each screening will be followed by an Open Forum by involving audience and experts from the field of water, sanitation etc.

S4 Water and Health – Managing Water Quality

14:00-17:00 Hrs
Hall 7-I

Clean, safe and adequate freshwater is vital to the survival of all living organisms and the smooth functioning of ecosystem, communities and economies. Driven by demographic change and economic growth, water is increasingly withdrawn, used, reused, treated, and disposed of. Urbanisation, agriculture, industry and climate change exert mounting pressure on both the quantity and quality of our water resources. Our water resources – green and blue – face a daunting future and the costs of inaction are very high. We are confronted by a combination of escalating water scarcity, increasing demand for clean water, and worsening water quality, which severely restricts water-related human activities, affects human health, and impacts the health of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Virtually every corner of the world is exposed to the water pollution challenge. Although improvements have been made in some regions, water pollution is on the rise globally. According to the World Health Organization, water borne diseases account for an estimated 4.1% of the total daily global burden of disease, and cause about 1.8 million human deaths annually. The World Health Organization estimates that 88% of that burden is attributable to unsafe water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

Every day, an estimated two million tonnes of human waste are disposed of in watercourses. Seventy percent of industrial wastes in developing countries are dumped untreated into waters where they pollute the usable water supply. The complexity of the challenge is revealed by the many in different forms that pollution can take the range of pollution sources, and the varying scales – local, regional or global – at which pollution can develop. Lack of monitoring and enforcement also makes it difficult for countries and regions to understand and deal with this challenge. Also declining water quality has become a global issue of concern as human populations grow, industrial and agricultural activities expand and climate change threatens to cause major alterations to the hydrological cycle. Water quality issues are complex and diverse, and are deserving urgent global attention and action

This seminar will draw attention to effective response measures related to water quality scenario, problems, pollution prevention, wise resource use and sound abatement practices and allow for an analysis of the alternatives to improve the current and future water quality problems. Ideas, examples and initiatives will be discussed during the session.

S5 Environment, Climate Change and Water

14:00-17:00 Hrs
Hall 7-II

Climate change is going to impact various facets of life and ecology and water. We know that Climate change is going to alter the distribution of quantity and quality of the World’s natural resources and adversely affect the livelihood of the people. With an economy closely tied to its natural resource base and climate-sensitive sectors like agriculture, fishery, industry, forestry etc. India may face a major threat because of the projected changes in climate. The major implications of climate change may be decline in Glaciers and Snow fields in Himalayas; decrease in the number of rainy days; over major part of the country-more drought like situations and increased flood events; changes in groundwater quality in alluvial aquifers, groundwater table recharge; and increased saline intrusion of coastal and inland aquifers due to rise in sea level. The impact is likely to be felt severely in developing countries especially with agrarian economies. India with Surging population, increased industrialization and associated high demand for fresh water, food and energy becomes highly vulnerable.

The systems need to build up resilience in themselves to ameliorate the effects of climate change. Multiple strategies like change in planning and management methodologies, reducing consumption by efficiency improvement and building new tools and techniques for better understanding and prediction of changed behavior of climate are required to be formulated, proven and implemented.

For this purpose of handling climate change, all consumer section will have to adapt to changes. Some of the sections may be able to move rapidly but the pace of change may not be equal amongst all sections. It may be necessary to recognize the fact that there cannot be exclusive allocations/reservations for single usage but adjustment and prioritization will be required without affecting the economic and sustainability status.

The session will be dedicated for highlighting the importance of integrated water resources management, the National Water Policy issues as well as Sustainable Development Goals of United Nations for planning, development and management of water resources sustainably.

CS3 Model for Efficient Water Management at Local Level in Urban and Peri-urban Areas

14:00-17:00 Hrs
Hall 7-III

An urban area is a location characterized by high human population density and vast human-built features in comparison to the areas surrounding it. The Peri-urban areas are the outskirts of the city. It can be described as the landscape interface between town and city or urban centres. In a growing economy, there is a continued expansion of peri-urban areas as the urban core expands into them.

Larger tracts of peri-urban land are utilized for development of Roads, Waste transfer stations, Recycling facilities & landfill sites, Park and ride sites, Airports, Large hospitals, Power plants, Water and sewerage treatment facilities, Factories; and Large out-of-town shopping facilities etc. These developmental activities results into many changes in socio-economic environment of this area. For example, replacement of natural soil and vegetation with artificial impermeable surfaces and the routing of rainwater along drains and sewers alter the natural hydrology and land use and land cover patterns of peri-urban regions.

The water requirement in urban and peri-urban areas has to be assessed based on different priorities specific to these areas and a comprehensive planning is required for efficient management of water resources. Urban area requires more water for drinking and municipal uses, where as peri-urban areas require more water for maintaining environmental and ecological balance.

Drainage problems in urban and peri-urban areas need careful attention as demonstrated by urban flooding incidents across the world. Land use planning and maintenance of detention basins as well as conveyance channels is an important aspect, often not catered adequately or is an un-coordinated environment, not attended to at all. Planning strategies have to factor this on a priority basis.

Since, the peri-urban interface is often the location of water supply facilities such as reservoirs, or the areas where underground water sources are mainly replenished, the urban growth leads to expansion of encroachment upon the catchment areas leading to mobilization of new sources and creating conflicts amongst urban and agricultural users. The interconnected water scarcity has impacts on both urban and peri-urban and surrounding rural areas, particularly for the poor with little or no access to water provisioning.

It is important to assess the efficiency of peri-urban water systems not only in terms of the costs involved, but also in the technologies applied and the strategies for saving water that can be implemented or upgraded such as micro-irrigation techniques and reuse and recycling of domestic and industrial water. The session will concentrate on specific case studies on the existing models available on efficient water management at local level in urban and peri-urban areas and for incorporating further improvements.

PD5 Strategy to Achieve Targets under UN Sustainable Development Goals in Water Sector

14:00-17:00 Hrs
Hall 7-IV

The 193 member states of the United Nations adopted 17 new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a unanimous commitment to end poverty, fight inequalities and injustice and tackle climate change. The goals are to be achieved by 2030. The goals added to the world agenda at the UN general assembly. The new goals replace the eight " Millennium Development Goals" adopted at a summit in 2000. Those expired at the end of 2015.

Out of the 17 SDGs adopted to transform the world water finds a role in ending poverty in all its forms everywhere; ending hunger, achieving food security and improved nutrition, and promoting sustainable agriculture; ensuring healthy lives and promoting wellbeing for all at all ages; ensuring availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all; ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all; taking urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts; and conservation and sustainably using the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development. While adopting the 17 SDGs, it is indicated that now is the time to take global action for the global resources and move the people and planet towards sustainable future. Water being the prime natural resource for sustaining lives and economies, finds an indirect implication in other goals as well.

Civil society groups around the world are organizing events to collectively raise their voices and spread awareness of the importance of sustainable development. Each country has a set of specific opportunities and constraints in terms of hydro meteorology, development stage and socio-economic and political structures. While planning for the strategy at the global level, dialogue is necessary for learning from the commonalities noticed amongst regions and solutions adopted. The panel discussion will concentrate on a comparative evaluation of strategies adopted and the best approach for developing countries of the world.

SE3 Water Film Fest

10:00-13:00 and 14:00-17:00 Hrs
Hall 8-V

India Water Week is one of the mega annual event of the Ministry of Water Resources, River Development & Ganga Rejuvenation. The Government of India started the event from 2012 onwards. The objective of the event is to provide a multi stakeholders forum to discuss key strategies for conservation, preservation and optimum use of available water and natural resources. This year the mega event will be organized from April 4 to April 8, 2016 on the theme “Water for All : Striving together”.

A major objective of the India Water Week is also to broaden the participation from all Stakeholders including the Youth at large and create awareness on various aspects related to water conservation. To fulfill this objective films and documentaries could play an extremely valuable role. In the recent past there have been several success stories related to water conservation in different parts of the country and sharing those motivating stories will help in replicating them further. Moreover, films could be an extremely important, viable and exciting medium to engage with youth and community directly.

IWP in association with CMSR Foundation ( a network partner of IWP) proposes to organize a day long screening of films and documentaries highlighting successful stories of water conservation, technological innovations and people’s participation during India Water Week-2016. Each screening will be followed by an Open Forum by involving audience and experts from the field of water, sanitation etc.