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  • April 05

     
  • April 06

  • April 07

  • April 08

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - I

    S6

    Agro Industries and Water

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - II

    BS4

    Groundwater Aquifer Mapping – Lessons Learnt

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - III

    CS4

    Basin Level Management Initiatives

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - IV

    PD6

    River Siltation, its Impact and Way Forward

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 8 - V

    SE4

    India Irrigation Forum – 2016

  • 10:00 to 13:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - VI

    SS

    Community Participation in Water Resources

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - I

    S7

    Creating Awareness for Water Conservation in Younger Generation

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - II

    BS5

    Institutionalizing People’s Participation in Water Planning and Management

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - III

    CS5

    Flood Risk Assessment -Lessons learnt from Recent Disasters in India

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - IV

    PD7

    Water and Power

  • 14:00 to 17:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 8 - V

    SE4

    India Irrigation Forum – 2016

  • 19:00 Hrs
    Hall No. 7 - VI

    7.00 PM : Cultural Program by National Bal Bhawan Member Children – Song and Dance followed by dinner at Pragati Maidan

S6 Agro Industries and Water

10:00-13.00 Hrs
Hall 7-I

Agro industry is regarded as the sunrise sector of the Indian economy in view of its large potential for growth and likely socio economic impact specifically on employment and income generation. The agro industry is regarded as an extended arm of agriculture. The development of the agro industry can help to stabilise and make agriculture more lucrative and create employment opportunities both at the production and marketing stages. The broad-based development of the agro-products industry will improve both the social and physical infrastructure of India. Since it would cause diversification and commercialization of agriculture, it will thus enhance the incomes of farmers and create food surpluses. In India, agriculture is the single most important livelihood of masses. Food grains production rose from 52 million tonnes in 1951-52 to 257.07 million tonnes in 2014-15. Manufacture of food products and beverages account for more than half of the total output of agro based industries in India. Under this category, the manufacture of grain mill products, starch products and prepared animal feeds is most important.

Agro industries particularly the food industry, generates large amounts of liquid, solid and gaseous wastes which emerge both from the processing operations and also from their treatment and disposal (eg. Sludge and H2S). The composition and quantity of agro-industries very much depend on the source of raw materials, as well as nature of products, operations and processing steps. In general, food processing wastes consists of large amounts of organic material (carbohydrate, protein, fat, oil etc) with high values of BOD, COD and suspended solids. Due to their high nutrient content, agro-industrial wastes have a high potential to cause severe water pollution problems.

Water thus plays a double role acting as a vital input for raw material generation for sustenance of agricultural activities on which the agro industry is based and also a process ingredient which has to be prevented from waste and degradation. Environmental footprint of agro industry from both these angles needs to be understood.

The seminar attempts to share experiences in context of above issues affecting growth and sustainability of agro industries as a part of overall growth and sustainability of agriculture.

BS4 Groundwater Aquifer Mapping – Lessons Learnt

10:00-13.00 Hrs
Hall 7-II

Groundwater Aquifer Mapping is a process wherein a combination of geological, geophysical, hydrological and chemical field and laboratory analyses are applied to characterize the quantity, quality and sustainability of groundwater present in aquifers. The primary objective of the aquifer mapping exercise can thus be summed up as “Know your Aquifer, Manage your Aquifer”.

The aquifer mapping has been initiated in several countries like US, Canada, Australia, South Africa, and India. The aquifer mapping cares to acquire the outputs such as disposition of water bearing formations indicating the characteristics of various layers present in the water bearing strata and its subsurface continuity and variations in vertical and horizontal dispositions; abstraction status; identification of runoff, recharge and discharge zones and determination of water quality of aquifer formations. The aquifer mapping project also includes formation of aquifer management unit by clustering of villages; and preparation of aquifer management plans for sustainable groundwater management.

In India, Central Ground Water Board (CGWB) has been entrusted to National Aquifer Mapping & Management (NAQUIM) on 1:50,000 scale. The CGWB has taken up the related studies in varied hydro-geologica lterrains of India namely Alluvial underlain by Crystalline & Desert Terrains and Basaltic, Crystalline, Coastal and Deep Alluvial Terrains. The results have been translated into Aquifer Maps and Aquifer Response Models so as to suggest the management interventions for tackling the issues identified through the aquifer mapping exercise.

Aquifer mapping exercise will create an estimate of the carrying capacity of an aquifer and enable planners and professionals to devise holistic water management strategies. Experiences generated will be shared and suggestions for improving the programme will be sought.

CS4 Basin Level Management Initiatives

10:00-13.00 Hrs
Hall 7-III

River basin is the most appropriate unit for planning, developing and managing water resources and for analysing water availability and water use in an integrated manner. Since the water resources are very diverse and scarce in availability, it is vital to adopt an appropriate institutional framework for managing them at basin scale level.

A river basin system is considered for the water resources planning components, both in-stream and off-stream demand components, and intermediate (treatment and recycling) components. The river basin is hence characterized not only by the natural and physical processes, but also by the physical projects and management policies/frame works. The essential relations within each component and the inter relations between these components in a basin can be considered in an integrated modelling network. The inherent logic of the basin as a natural, functional, and an analytical unit is hence considering the basin’s suitability, utility and sustainability as a planning and management unit. The entire exercises are to be supported by the pattern and demand of human activity and their wellbeing while taking action for preserving and protecting the surrounding ecosystems.

The basin level management initiatives have entered the lexicon of water managers and stakeholders as a mainstream approach. This approach is to ensure water management by assembling a wide range of developmental activities within the connected physiographic region in order to move all the stakeholders collectively to new demand patterns of water uses and allocations to all concerned sectors. The approach may have to provide for varying degrees of economic and environmental enhancement while balancing the fluctuating quantities and qualities of water supply available in the basin as a unit. Basin level management therefore entails complex management initiatives.

The case study session will take stock of the case studies on basin level management initiatives under taken by developed and developing countries such as carried out in Murray Darling River Basin and Menkong River Basin etc.

PD6 River Siltation, its Impact and Way Forward

10:00-13.00 Hrs
Hall 7-IV

Rivers in India carry huge amounts of sediment generated especially during high flow conditions primarily due to erosion problem in the vulnerable reaches, anthropogenic activities and other reasons. The silt carried by rivers have produced factual flood plains over geological times and in shorter time spans, have increased the problems of course changes and increased erosion in some reaches. The siltation also affects the storage capacities of the reservoirs, especially those with small live storages and needs to be managed appropriately. Also, the silt provides minor minerals in the form of sand and gravel forming an important input towards growing habitation.

India has by now about 4500 large reservoirs and lakhs of smaller reservoirs. The live storage capacity through large reservoirs accounts for about 214 BCM which is gradually getting lost due to continuous siltation of useful storages. An estimate by National Commission for Integrated Water Resources Development has indicated that the annual loss of live storage capacity is at about 1.3 BCM. However, the actual trends need to be monitored continuously.

In addition to reservoir, aggradations of river beds, particularly alluvial rivers of Northern plains, lead to changes in the morphology and fluvial behavior of these rivers. This tendency leads to variety of problems including meandering patterns, changes in spills of rivers, river bed aggradations etc.

There is a necessity of arresting the tendency of siltation by adoption of comprehensive measures towards catchment area treatment. Removal of silt from storage reservoirs through mechanical dredging or structural interventions need be evaluated completely. A silt and sand management strategy incorporating fundamental concepts of river morphology, hydrology and backed by some legal measures and enforcement mechanism is the need of the hour. Effective management of silt may be necessary to mitigate adverse impacts of siltation. The Panel Discussion aims at sharing experiences and evolving developmental pathways.

SE4 India Irrigation Forum – 2016

10:00-13.00 and 14.00-17.00 Hrs
Hall 8-V

India’s population is steadily growing and is expected to stabilize around 1.6 billion by 2050 (present about 1.28 billion) putting pressure on limited and scarce water resources due to rapid urbanization, industrialization and pollution of water sources. India faces a daunting task of feeding population requiring about 380 metric tons (MT) food against present food production of about 260 MT. Since both land and water resources are finite resources, increased agricultural production will have to come from the same limited net sown area by increasing productivity with an optimal use of available water and land resources. Irrigation along with improved water management and agronomical practices will play a significant role in achieving this target.

We are aware that numerous challenges and concerns related to climatic, technical, economic and organizational aspects are plaguing water sector. Further, India would be facing increasing water stress in near future due to increasing population and impacts of increasing climate variability due to impacts of climate change putting added pressure on irrigated agriculture. In addition performance of major surface irrigation systems in the country suffer from poor performance due to various reasons. At the same time it has to be recognized that expansion of irrigated agriculture is essential as a strategy for meeting future food security of India’s galloping population. Improved irrigation and drainage management along with use of innovative strategies for improving water use efficiency and productivity including overall improvement of performance of irrigation systems would have to be adopted to address these concerns and challenges in a holistic and integrated manner.

There is consensus among policy-makers in the developing world that a lack of capacity is one of the major constraint in the sustainable development of irrigated agriculture so there is need of a well-informed, skilled and technology savvy contingent of agriculture scientists, irrigation engineers, and extension service workers to support this effort. There is need for systematic efforts in the direction of knowledge management and capacity development at the level of both institutions and individual.

Fully realizing the importance of knowledge sharing and capacity development for attaining sustainable developments in irrigation, drainage and flood management sectors, ICID took initiative to set up India Irrigation Forum (IIF) to provide a platform for networking, exchanging experiences, sharing of knowledge and interaction amongst various professionals engaged in agriculture water management. IIF proposes to organize an annual event and first such event`(India Irrigation Forum-2016) is planned to be organized in April 2016 as a side event of IWW- 2016. Keeping in view the challenges associated with ensuring food and water security, the theme of the event is considered as “Innovative Techniques for Improving Water use Efficiency (WUE) of Irrigation Systems and Farm Application” while the Sub-themes are (i) Water food energy nexus including WUE- concept, definitions, strategies etc., (ii) Modernization and revitalization of irrigation system, (iii) Water saving techniques with emphasis on micro irrigation systems and (iv) Need for capacity development of professionals and farmers engaged in agriculture water management.

S7 Creating Awareness for Water Conservation in Younger Generation

14.00-17.00 Hrs
Hall 7-I

Three-quarters of the Earth's surface is covered in water, yet the global supply of clean, fresh water is steadily decreasing due to growing demand, pollution and sanitation issues as well as climate change. Across the globe, as many regions face dire water shortages, the challenge is to ensure that all citizens have equal access to safe water, now and the future. In addition to water supply issues resulting from increasing population accompanied with increased demand of irrigation water to increase food grain production and other industrial needs, there are other issues as well such as water quality and low capacity for water treatment, which have put further strain on the available freshwater supply for human consumption.

How do we solve these problems, and how should the younger generation be sensitized about these issues? The problem that the present generation is facing on this front is much less severe than what the scenario is likely to be in the next few decades. It is the future generation that is going to face the brunt of the problem of acute water shortages and unless the water conservation strategies do not involve this young generation in a big way, who are the potential stakeholders in very near future, the problem is not going to have a long lasting solution.

Younger generation needs to be sensitized to water management issues in a holistic manner with due exposure to the policies adopted in past, outcomes thereof and interventions that are likely to be needed in the context of ever growing population and changing life style needs.

Younger generation is also not a homogenous group where one size fits for all kind of exposure solutions that can be implemented. A graduated approach is needed for exposing different groups to different levels of knowledge and principles so that their growth in the education, profession/careers is endowed with relevant knowledge about water management principles.

PD7 Water and Power

14.00-17.00 Hrs
Hall 7-IV

Water and power are fundamental components of our 21st century life, but they can no longer be considered separately. Just as producing power consumes water, pumping, treating and distributing water requires power. After water and power experts trying to solve their own problems separately for several decades, more and more of them begin to realize that the two fundamental resources are not independent from each other. In other words, water is a power issue; power is a water issue. Called the water-power nexus, this inter relationship is beginning to receive the attention it merits.

Water and power are two critical natural resource issues facing most parts of the world today. World primary power demand is anticipated to increase by a third in the next 25 years. Fossil fuels which will still reign in 2035, are finite and far from environmentally friendly, responsible for more than 90% of CO2 emissions. Although worldwide, renewable power technologies are gaining more and more attention, especially under an ever increasing pressure of green house gas emission reduction, considerable economic barriers are still expected.

While achieving power energy security, the management of power sources and grid stability are gaining importance as we move towards non-conventional sources of electrical power. Thus, the issue of a right mix of various sources is needed for a stable power supply regime. Since water is also a random source, the development and generation strategies, therefore, need to integrate with the water availability scenarios.

Unlike power there are hardly any new supplies or substitutes for water resources – only 100,000 km3 of water resources is available every year for the whole world. Due to continuing population growth, contamination caused by human activities, new technological demand, as well as the impacts of climate change, water crisis aggravating globally. Even under non-drought conditions, many regions are expected to experience local, regional, or State-wise water stress. Many regions will have to deal with extremely high water shortage risks by 2050.

To have an optimum development of water and power, multipurpose planning and development of water resources is needed. More attention has to be paid for power development from renewable resources. The seminar seeks contribution in the areas of Water resources development through multipurpose planning; Accelerated development of hydropower as a renewable source of energy; and Need of storage based projects to solve water and power issues.

BS5 Institutionalizing People’s Participation in Water Planning and Management

14.00-17.00 Hrs
Hall 7-II

Declining per capita availability and rapid transformation of usage patterns are emerging challenges before the water resources managers. Water affects all and therefore, participation and involvement of all is vital to the sustainable development.

International Association for Public Participation describes public participation as any process that involves the public in problem solving or decision making and uses public input to make better decisions. The public participation aims actively to increase attention to and inclusion of the interest of those usually marginalized e.g. politically disenfranchised minorities or poor people indirectly affected by water management. Principle 10 of the 1992 Rio Declaration on Environment and Development (UNCED 1992) urges nations to facilitate public participation through methods that increase (a) transparency, (b) participatory decision-making and (c) accountability. These elements may be described respectively as: (a) informing people of water issues or activities that may affect them, (b) involving the public in decision-making regarding such activities and (c) providing those adversely affected by these decisions and activities with the means of seeking redress.

Water is essential for life. It is also at the core of sustainable development. In general, although many water resources projects are technically and economically yielding the desired benefit and have brought prosperity. However, spreading the same on an equitable manner is a challenge yet to be addressed fully. Water resources project is essentially a community project when it is made operational as the structures and facilities are spread for and wide. The economic outputs generated by the project get deployed amongst a multitude of community requirements and continued infusion of capital is not preferred by the owners i.e. Government. Therefore, participation of the stakeholders in the management of the project and thus managerial, logistical and financial support is obligatory for an irrigation project. A mechanism has to be evolved here to make all stakeholders from upstream and downstream areas of the proposed irrigation projects participate at planning stage e.g. Cropping pattern, R&R etc. for maximizing project benefits and minimizing losses and better management of the project.

The beneficiary groups have wide gaps in terms of their knowledge base, technological and managerial capabilities and social cohesiveness. Finding a way out of the range of constraints is a unique experience in societal management. Since no two situations are alike in this sphere, it is necessary to continually share the experiences and maintain a head-up on the learning cause for succeeding in tasks in hand for irrigation managers. The Brainstorming Session will be devoted for deliberating the available mechanisms worldwide and suggestions and views derived from that for setting up/improving the institutional arrangements for strengthening people’s participation in Water Resources Planning and Management.

CS5 Flood Risk Assessment -Lessons learnt from Recent Disasters in India

14.00-17.00 Hrs
Hall 7-III

Flood risk is a matter of national concern and is an important aspect of consideration for land use planning. The National Water Mission (NWM) clearly states the need to give focused attention to vulnerable areas including over-exploited areas through a systematic approach for coping with floods. Out of 29 states in India, 11 states are prone to flood and some of these states often experience more than one flood event a year. The economic losses to the nation are huge; the recent Chennai flood losses are estimated at INR 20,034 crore, Uttarakhand flood alone has resulted in economic losses of INR 6,600 crore. Devastating floods of Jammu and Kashmir have caused an immediate loss of INR 5,400-5,700 crores, well exceeding 10% of the state’s GDP.

Over the last six decades, India has taken several initiatives toward flood risk management and effective utilization of the water resources for food security and national development. Across the globe the approach towards flood risk management has changed based on the learning and experiences focusing on an integrated approach to flood risk management. This is very relevant in the case of India which has a large density of rivers and population. The economic growth triggered through various initiatives of government and external funding programs which vary from watershed management, rural development to the smart city initiatives all need to consider flood risk aspects to ensure that the investment on these development programs will fetch the expected sustainable economic benefits.

With this background, it is important to have a retrospect and review of Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) in India and understand the best practices globally to take proactive measures to reduce risk and ensure sustainable development. FRA helps deliver real change in managing flood risk early on in the development plan process thus leading to safeguard life and assets at the same time helping in optimum use of the water resources for livelihood and development.

RMSI provides consulting services in flood risk assessment to a wide range of clients across the world for the last 20 years. Selected panelists from diverse fields of expertise and areas of operation will to carry out focused discussions on lessons learnt from recent disasters in India and develop a road map towards proactive flood risk management. The anticipated panelists include representatives of multi lateral agencies, international experts, government representative of Water Resource Department, academicians, and practicing consultants. The discussion at the session will find uses amongst various schemes of India and United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

PD8Water and Power

10.00-13.00 Hrs
Hall 4

Water and power are fundamental components of our 21st century life, but they can no longer be considered separately. Just as producing power consumes water, pumping, treating and distributing water requires power. After water and power experts trying to solve their own problems separately for several decades, more and more of them begin to realize that the two fundamental resources are not independent from each other. In other words, water is a power issue; power is a water issue. Called the water-power nexus, this interrelationship is beginning to receive the attention it merits.

Water and power are two critical natural resource issues facing most parts of the world today. World primary power demand is anticipated to increase by a third in the next 25 years. Fossil fuels which will still reign in 2035, are finite and far from environmentally friendly, responsible for more than 90% ofCO2 emissions. Although worldwide, renewable power technologies are gaining more and more attention, especially under a never increasing pressure of green house gas emission reduction, considerable economic barriers are still expected.

While achieving power energy security, the management of power sources and grid stability are gaining importance as we move towards non-conventional sources of electrical power. Thus, the issue of a right mix of various sources is needed for a stable power supply regime. Since water is also a random source, the development and generation strategies, therefore, need to integrate with the water availability scenarios.

Unlike power there are hardly any new supplies or substitutes for water resources – only 100,000 km3 of water resources is available every year for the whole world. Due to continuing population growth, contamination caused by human activities, new technological demand, as well as the impacts of climate change, water crisis aggravating globally. Even under non-drought conditions, many region are expected to experience local, regional, or State-wise water stress. Many regions will have to deal with extremely high water shortage risks by 2050.

To have an optimum development of water and power, multipurpose planning and development of water resources is needed. More attention has to be paid for power development from renewable resources. The seminar seeks contribution in the areas of Water resources development through multipurpose planning; Accelerated development of hydropower as a renewable source of energy; and Need of storage based projects to solve water and power issues.

SE4 India Irrigation Forum – 2016

10:00-13.00 and 14.00-17.00 Hrs
Hall 8-V

India’s population is steadily growing and is expected to stabilize around 1.6 billion by 2050 (present about 1.28 billion) putting pressure on limited and scarce water resources due to rapid urbanization, industrialization and pollution of water sources. India faces a daunting task of feeding population requiring about 380 metric tons (MT) food against present food production of about 260 MT. Since both land and water resources are finite resources, increased agricultural production will have to come from the same limited net sown area by increasing productivity with an optimal use of available water and land resources. Irrigation along with improved water management and agronomical practices will play a significant role in achieving this target.

We are aware that numerous challenges and concerns related to climatic, technical, economic and organizational aspects are plaguing water sector. Further, India would be facing increasing water stress in near future due to increasing population and impacts of increasing climate variability due to impacts of climate change putting added pressure on irrigated agriculture. In addition performance of major surface irrigation systems in the country suffer from poor performance due to various reasons. At the same time it has to be recognized that expansion of irrigated agriculture is essential as a strategy for meeting future food security of India’s galloping population. Improved irrigation and drainage management along with use of innovative strategies for improving water use efficiency and productivity including overall improvement of performance of irrigation systems would have to be adopted to address these concerns and challenges in a holistic and integrated manner.

There is consensus among policy-makers in the developing world that a lack of capacity is one of the major constraint in the sustainable development of irrigated agriculture so there is need of a well-informed, skilled and technology savvy contingent of agriculture scientists, irrigation engineers, and extension service workers to support this effort. There is need for systematic efforts in the direction of knowledge management and capacity development at the level of both institutions and individual.

Fully realizing the importance of knowledge sharing and capacity development for attaining sustainable developments in irrigation, drainage and flood management sectors, ICID took initiative to set up India Irrigation Forum (IIF) to provide a platform for networking, exchanging experiences, sharing of knowledge and interaction amongst various professionals engaged in agriculture water management. IIF proposes to organize an annual event and first such event`(India Irrigation Forum-2016) is planned to be organized in April 2016 as a side event of IWW- 2016. Keeping in view the challenges associated with ensuring food and water security, the theme of the event is considered as “Innovative Techniques for Improving Water use Efficiency (WUE) of Irrigation Systems and Farm Application” while the Sub-themes are (i) Water food energy nexus including WUE- concept, definitions, strategies etc., (ii) Modernization and revitalization of irrigation system, (iii) Water saving techniques with emphasis on micro irrigation systems and (iv) Need for capacity development of professionals and farmers engaged in agriculture water management.